Church Size

Is Your Church Measuring Health Or Size? They’re Not The Same Thing

What’s better, a healthy church of 50, or a healthy church of 5,000? The answer should be obvious, but often isn’t.

They’re the same.

Certainly a healthy church of 5,000 is ministering to more people than a healthy church of 50. But a healthy church is a healthy church.

We need to weigh small and large churches the way we measure feathers and bricks. 100 healthy churches of 50 have the same spiritual and numerical weight as one healthy church of 5,000.

Is Your Church Measuring Health Or Size? They’re Not The Same Thing

What’s better, a healthy church of 50, or a healthy church of 5,000? The answer should be obvious, but often isn’t.

They’re the same.

Certainly a healthy church of 5,000 is ministering to more people than a healthy church of 50. But a healthy church is a healthy church.

We need to weigh small and large churches the way we measure feathers and bricks. 100 healthy churches of 50 have the same spiritual and numerical weight as one healthy church of 5,000.

Supporting Small Churches Does Not Mean Bashing Big Churches

I like big- and megachurches. I wish there were more of them.

I like small churches even more. I wish there were a lot more of them.

As I continue to write and speak about the value of small churches, I’m noticing a disturbing mini-trend that I want to opt out of. It’s the tendency in some people, when they hear that I’m for small churches, to start talking trash about megachurches.

“Megachurches are so shallow,” they say. “Big churches don’t care for their members as much as small churches do.” And “a large crowd is the sign of a shallow church,” are just a few of the comments I’ve heard recently.

And, of course, there’s the meme that keeps making the rounds showing a huge megachurch, with the words “When you tell them what they want to hear”, contrasted with a photo of a small, empty church, and the words “When you preach the truth.”

Ugh.

Not only is that not an accurate picture of reality, it undermines the power of the Gospel to draw people to Jesus, in both large and small crowds.