Worship

6 Important Differences Between Performance Music And Worship Music

Music has always been a point of contention in the church. But when it comes to music I seldom see the church arguing over anything that’s actually worth arguing over. So what is worth arguing over – or at least taking seriously? We need to understand the differences between music for worship and music in …

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Hillsong Church Doesn’t Sing “Shout To The Lord” Anymore? Good For Them

Every church has a calling.

In addition to the mission we all share – namely, the Great Commandment and Great Commission – every congregation has a specific reason they exist.

For Hillsong Church, a big part of that calling has been to write, sing and send their songs around the world, to be sung by hundreds of thousands of other congregations.

In a recent article, The Christian Post quoted Hillsong’s pastor, Brian Houston from a recent Catalyst conference talk. Houston said that if you go to Hillsong church, you won’t be hearing their most famous songs, like “Shout to the Lord” or “Oceans” anymore. They’ve moved on.

Good for them.

Hillsong Church Doesn’t Sing “Shout To The Lord” Anymore? Good For Them

Every church has a calling.

In addition to the mission we all share – namely, the Great Commandment and Great Commission – every congregation has a specific reason they exist.

For Hillsong Church, a big part of that calling has been to write, sing and send their songs around the world, to be sung by hundreds of thousands of other congregations.

In a recent article, The Christian Post quoted Hillsong’s pastor, Brian Houston from a recent Catalyst conference talk. Houston said that if you go to Hillsong church, you won’t be hearing their most famous songs, like “Shout to the Lord” or “Oceans” anymore. They’ve moved on.

Good for them.

Adding A Second Church Service Without Killing Your Momentum

Has your church ever tried to add a second weekend worship service, only to have it flame out? This was the question that was asked on a small church pastors’ discussion board recently.

Several of the responses were, understandably, along these two lines:

“That’s a ‘problem’ I’d love to have.”
“Going to two services killed our momentum. Never again.”

So, yes, needing to add a service is a ‘problem’ many churches would love to face, but if you don’t do it well, it can hurt more than it helps. So let me share with you how our church did it without killing our momentum.

Pastors, We Need To Stop Expecting Worship Leaders To Do Our Job For Us

There are two interesting, but conflicting conversations happening among church leaders right now. Especially, but not exclusively, on social media.

On the one hand, people are decrying the supposed shallowness of today’s worship songs.

On the other hand, there’s a push to keep sermons under 20 minutes long.

It’s not always the same people saying both of those things, but I have noticed a surprising amount of overlap.

Does anyone else see the irony here?

At the same time that many are encouraging shorter sermons, we’re also wanting deep theology from three-minute songs.

Pastors, if the theology being presented in our churches isn’t deep enough, it’s not the worship leader’s responsibility to make it deeper. That’s our job, our calling and our mandate.

A mandate that can’t always be done in 20 minutes or less.

4 Reasons Our Church Stopped Doing ‘Come and Watch’ Events (And 5 Alternatives)

Many churches have experienced great success and growth doing big ‘come and watch’ events.

Even if choir cantatas on Christmas and Easter have been replaced by a special illustrated message with stage design, lighting and video, the idea is the same – to draw people in so we can present the gospel to them.

The big ‘come and watch’ event may still work in some places, but many church leaders (like Carey Nieuwhof, in a recent helpful post) have found that they work less well than they used to – or we thought they did.

Several years ago, our church stopped doing ‘come and watch’ events on special Sundays, like Christmas and Easter. Then we stopped doing them altogether.

Here’s why:

We Can Whine About the New Generation or Worship with Them – But We Can’t Do Both

Why don’t people wear their Sunday Best for church any more?

A lot of older churchgoers (that is, my generation) seem to be worried about that lately.

I’d like to respond to that question with a couple of my own.

When did the members of my generation become such old fogeys? And why do they care so much about something that matters so little?

Yet that is part of a growing sentiment from my peers.

Have we forgotten how devalued we felt when they told us our music was too loud, our clothing looked silly and our opinions were wrong? It didn’t make us want to worship their way. It made us want to leave the church. And many of us did – never to return.