Encouragement

Leading A Church Through Difficult Times: A Lesson From “The Most Bombed Hotel In The World”

Leading a church is often a lesson in managing and overcoming frustration. Hopefully not all the time. But there are those seasons…

This week I’ve learned a great lesson about triumphing over extreme difficulty and frustration from a very unlikely source – a hotel my wife and I are staying at that’s known as “The Most Bombed Hotel In The World.”

If you Google that phrase (or click here where I’ve done it for you), you’ll find out a whole lot about the Hotel Europa. We’re staying here courtesy of the Presbyterian Church of Ireland who we’ve come to encourage this week.

The hotel hasn’t been bombed since 1994, and it’s a beautiful building in the heart of downtown Belfast. It’s an unexpected blessing to stay in such a nice hotel. And it’s always great to learn something new, too.

First, let me give you a little history of this hotel, then I’ll share what it can teach us about managing difficulties as church leaders.

The Church Is Stronger When Small Congregations Are Encouraged, Resourced And Engaged

The body of Christ can’t afford to alienate small churches any longer.

Especially since we make up 90 percent of churches, where half of all Christians attend, worship and minister.

If we want the body of Christ to remain strong, focused on mission and reaching our communities and world with the gospel of Jesus we can’t overlook the smaller congregations any more.

When small churches and their leaders feel valued and involved, they do better ministry.
When their voices are included in church leadership conversations, the body of Christ is better informed.

When their concerns are heard and addressed, small congregations get healthier, and the entire church is stronger, more united, and more fully engaged in the mission.

The Church Is Stronger When Small Congregations Are Encouraged, Resourced And Engaged

The body of Christ can’t afford to alienate small churches any longer.

Especially since we make up 90 percent of churches, where half of all Christians attend, worship and minister.

If we want the body of Christ to remain strong, focused on mission and reaching our communities and world with the gospel of Jesus we can’t overlook the smaller congregations any more.

When small churches and their leaders feel valued and involved, they do better ministry.
When their voices are included in church leadership conversations, the body of Christ is better informed.

When their concerns are heard and addressed, small congregations get healthier, and the entire church is stronger, more united, and more fully engaged in the mission.

5 Simple Statements Any Small Church Pastor Would Love To Hear

Too many small church pastors are doing most, or all, of their ministry alone.

Most wonder if anyone outside the church even knows or cares that they exist. That isolation can become toxic. And it can start to bleed out into their congregations, confirming the worst stereotypes about why small churches remain small.

On top of that, when we look for help, we often find more frustration than encouragement – as we discussed in my last post, 5 Things You Should Never Say To A Small Church Pastor.

But it doesn’t have to be that way. If we took just a little time and energy to reach out, we could help reverse this trend.