Church

Whatever Happened To Churches Meeting Felt Needs? – And What Should Replace It?

Meeting people’s needs is a big part of the church’s mandate. Tasks like feeding the poor, caring for children and widows, and helping addicts find freedom is essential to loving our neighbors as Christ has loved us. But meeting people’s “felt” needs has always been a slippery slope because people tend to feel their most …

Whatever Happened To Churches Meeting Felt Needs? – And What Should Replace It? Read More »

Forget The Extras – Your Church Needs To Get The Basics Right

This week I went to a restaurant with a large group of people. When the server took our order she didn’t write anything down. She said she could keep it all in her head. That’s impressive. Except. She didn’t get the order right. There’s no sense doing the extras if you’re failing on the basics.

All Churches Make Mistakes, Why Do Ours Feel Fatal?

No church is perfect. Some churches make mistakes but keep growing and moving ahead at lightning speed, while other churches make similar mistakes, but can’t seem to make even the smallest forward progress. Even the world’s fastest-growing churches regularly make mistakes, but those mistakes don’t seem to affect their forward motion at all. It’s frustrating …

All Churches Make Mistakes, Why Do Ours Feel Fatal? Read More »

Is Your Church Resisting Necessary Change? Try This Helpful Strategy

What does a pastor do when change is needed in order to reach a changing community – or simply to keep the current congregation alive – but we’re met with resistance from the very church members whose support and energy are needed to get the job done?

My most important advice to pastors facing this dilemma is easy to state, but very difficult to do. Don’t attack their comfort zone, ease their fears.

Don’t attack their comfort zone, ease their fears.
It’s easier to get someone to move from something familiar to something new by helping them see the advantages of the new idea than by attacking a familiar idea. And the first step in doing that is to make the new idea more appealing by making it less frightening.

Pastors, The Church Is Not Our Personal Platform

The church belongs to Jesus.

It is not owned by its denomination, its donors, its members, its staff or its lead pastor.

Jesus said he would build his church – and he’s not about to give it up to us.

As a pastor, this is a lesson I need to remind myself of regularly, so I thought I’d share that reminder with you as well.

Why The Church Exists
The church does not exist to give us an audience for our ideas, projects or egos. It exists to fulfill Christ’s purposes. Our role is to equip the church members to enact those purposes, both inside and outside the church walls.

The church exists to make Jesus known, not to make pastors famous.

A Friendly Reminder: “Come To Jesus” Is More Important Than “Come To Our Church”

Here’s a sincere question for my fellow pastors and other church leaders.

What if the members of our churches started sharing their faith, but it wasn’t in a way that brought more people to our specific church? Could we be okay with that?

If not, we may not be as much about kingdom growth as we think we are.

As people use social media to make new relationships and keep in touch with friends who have moved away, more aspects of our lives are happening without regard to geography. From crying with a friend going through a divorce, to celebrating the joy of childbirth, many of our most intimate moments are being lived through Facebook Live, Skype and FaceTime.

More people who share their faith are doing it online, too. Which means that the friends and family members they’re sharing it with are becoming less likely to be able to attend church together.

This has great potential for our church’s participation in kingdom growth, even if it doesn’t always result in the numerical growth of our local congregation.

A Friendly Reminder: “Come To Jesus” Is More Important Than “Come To Our Church”

Here’s a sincere question for my fellow pastors and other church leaders.

What if the members of our churches started sharing their faith, but it wasn’t in a way that brought more people to our specific church? Could we be okay with that?

If not, we may not be as much about kingdom growth as we think we are.

As people use social media to make new relationships and keep in touch with friends who have moved away, more aspects of our lives are happening without regard to geography. From crying with a friend going through a divorce, to celebrating the joy of childbirth, many of our most intimate moments are being lived through Facebook Live, Skype and FaceTime.

More people who share their faith are doing it online, too. Which means that the friends and family members they’re sharing it with are becoming less likely to be able to attend church together.

This has great potential for our church’s participation in kingdom growth, even if it doesn’t always result in the numerical growth of our local congregation.

Want More Church Leaders? Look For A Servant’s Heart

“It’s hard to find people who will step up and lead in the church today. Especially young people.”

That’s what I keep hearing.

But I also see many churches that are the exceptions to that supposed rule. Including the amazing congregation I get to serve.

What are healthy churches doing to encourage, create and train a new generation of leaders?

There are a lot of factors, of course. Far too many for one blog post. But if I had to isolate it to one primary factor, it would be this.

Healthy churches find potential leaders by paying attention to people with a servant’s heart first, leadership skills second.